Guelph's Community Plan: Revisited

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Thank you for being part of the ongoing conversation!

This consultation is now closed, but the work has just begun. Watch here for updates and continuing this work with actions toward the elimination of systemic racism.

___

Our goal is to set the community standard for the elimination of systemic racism.

Guelph’s Community Plan was always intended to evolve and grow with the community. Right now we are working to address the significant omission of any direction related to systemic racism in the first version of the Plan. After more than a year of learning and unlearning with community leaders, this is the draft of a new section we will add to the Community Plan--and we are hoping you will take a look and add your thoughts.


Nobody thinks this is an easy goal, but it’s an aspiration we need to reach and fight to achieve.

This new section of the Community Plan speaks of a vision for how we must work as a united community. The section talks about the importance of building the relationships and trust necessary for the sustained effort required to eradicate the racism and colonialism embedded in our structural systems.

We acknowledge that racism and exclusion exist in many forms including but not limited to: Anti-Black racism, Anti-Indigenous racism, Anti-Asian racism, Anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, Anti-2SLGBTQIA+, ageism and ableism.

We also acknowledge that some conversations about systemic racism are difficult for some people. We have partnered with Here247 to provide free mental health or crisis support if you need it while having these difficult conversations with us. Visit the Here247 website or call 1-844-437-3247 to speak to a trusted service provider.

Help us to get it right!

Please take some time to read the background information tab below including important information about how we got here, and revisit the original Community Plan to see the new section in context.

Each of the eight new category sections were built based on conversations with people and communities from across Guelph, but we may hot have heard from you. Please read each section and share your thoughts and your unique ideas to help reframe the Community Plan with a vision about how we will work together to end systemic racism.

Click on each category to review and share your ideas:

What comes next?

The next step will be to create an action plan with the specific strategies and actions that need to be taken to rid systemic racism and barriers to inclusion from our institutions, policies and governance structures. Specific actions related to wellbeing, mental health, housing, economic and educational opportunity, and access to services among others will be considered in that phase of work.


Thank you for your time to consider these words and for adding your thoughts and suggestions.


Art Credit: Art Not Shame community of artists led by Melanie Schambach. Thank you for use of the inspiring work Art in Hard Times as our banner image.

Thank you for being part of the ongoing conversation!

This consultation is now closed, but the work has just begun. Watch here for updates and continuing this work with actions toward the elimination of systemic racism.

___

Our goal is to set the community standard for the elimination of systemic racism.

Guelph’s Community Plan was always intended to evolve and grow with the community. Right now we are working to address the significant omission of any direction related to systemic racism in the first version of the Plan. After more than a year of learning and unlearning with community leaders, this is the draft of a new section we will add to the Community Plan--and we are hoping you will take a look and add your thoughts.


Nobody thinks this is an easy goal, but it’s an aspiration we need to reach and fight to achieve.

This new section of the Community Plan speaks of a vision for how we must work as a united community. The section talks about the importance of building the relationships and trust necessary for the sustained effort required to eradicate the racism and colonialism embedded in our structural systems.

We acknowledge that racism and exclusion exist in many forms including but not limited to: Anti-Black racism, Anti-Indigenous racism, Anti-Asian racism, Anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, Anti-2SLGBTQIA+, ageism and ableism.

We also acknowledge that some conversations about systemic racism are difficult for some people. We have partnered with Here247 to provide free mental health or crisis support if you need it while having these difficult conversations with us. Visit the Here247 website or call 1-844-437-3247 to speak to a trusted service provider.

Help us to get it right!

Please take some time to read the background information tab below including important information about how we got here, and revisit the original Community Plan to see the new section in context.

Each of the eight new category sections were built based on conversations with people and communities from across Guelph, but we may hot have heard from you. Please read each section and share your thoughts and your unique ideas to help reframe the Community Plan with a vision about how we will work together to end systemic racism.

Click on each category to review and share your ideas:

What comes next?

The next step will be to create an action plan with the specific strategies and actions that need to be taken to rid systemic racism and barriers to inclusion from our institutions, policies and governance structures. Specific actions related to wellbeing, mental health, housing, economic and educational opportunity, and access to services among others will be considered in that phase of work.


Thank you for your time to consider these words and for adding your thoughts and suggestions.


Art Credit: Art Not Shame community of artists led by Melanie Schambach. Thank you for use of the inspiring work Art in Hard Times as our banner image.

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    CLOSED: This ideas has concluded.

    Element 7 of 8

    For the new section of the Community Plan, the proposed language in the element titled Data and Story Sovereignty is below. Please share your ideas to make this content even better. What is missing? What gives you hope? What can be stronger?

    Be sure to review the rest of the Community Plan to see how this fits in the document as a whole.


    • Consent for the use of a community member’s data and stories has only been granted when it is freely given, reversible, informed, enthusiastic, and specific.2

    • Community members who share stories and data should control how their information can be used.

    • Community members and organizations should be fairly recognized for their time, data, stories and contributions.

    • Understand the limitations of research due to the presence of systemic racism in data collection, analysis, dissemination and access. Data has often been used against contributing communities. 

    • Communities should neither be counted or discounted based solely on their size.

    • Institutions should take a trauma informed and harm-reduction approach when collecting data and engaging the community about systemic racism. 

    • Institutions undertaking data collection and community engagement need to have a plan for participants requiring or requesting mental health support.



    Reference 2. The FRIES acronym for consent was developed by Planned Parenthood, but can pertain to many different circumstances.


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    CLOSED: This ideas has concluded.

    Section 8 of 8

    For the new section of the Community Plan, the proposed language in the element titled Shared Language and Understanding is below. Please share your ideas that can make this content even better. What is missing? What gives you hope? What can be stronger?

    Be sure to review the rest of the Community Plan to see how this fits in the document as a whole.


    • Community institutions have a responsibility to share what they learn so that others may have the opportunity to benefit from their collective knowledge, understanding and opportunities for growth.

    • Recognize  that words and phrases we use carry different meanings and can be harmful. 

    • Continually seek clarity to make sure the right language is used in communication and engagement.

    • Community organizations should prioritize accessibility in communication and engagement, which can include translation, plain language and making information available in appropriate formats so that everyone can fully participate.3 



    Reference 3. When communicating and engaging, consider how to include everyone, for example, written material is in plain language, Heading Styles are used and fonts are Ariel or Verdana, 11 point or larger and the colour is easy to see. Include the contact information to request an accessible format of the material. Presentations that include a virtual option have captions available, all slide information is spoken and allow for different ways for the audience to communicate, such as speaking or in the chat, raise hand in the software or physically raise hand. Accommodate a person to fully participate as they request.


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Page last updated: 02 Feb 2022, 07:32 AM