Know Your Zone

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Know Your Zone

The proposed new zoning bylaw is now available for review.

Important note: The zoning bylaw only applies to properties within the City of Guelph. It does not affect properties in Guelph Eramosa Township or the Township of Puslinch.

We have written a new zoning bylaw that aligns with the City’s updated Official Plan, reflects contemporary zoning practices and works for you and your neighbours today and in the future. Really, we’re making sure all the pieces fit together to support our shared vision for growth as laid out in the Official Plan through a new set of rules.

The zoning bylaw sets out rules for all properties in the city, including rules for:

  • how a property can be used
  • the size of a property
  • where buildings can go on a property
  • how tall, what size, and how many buildings can be built
  • the number of parking spaces and where the spaces are located

We have looked at each and every property in Guelph—each residential, commercial, and industrial property, all City-owned and private property, everything, and the proposed new zoning bylaw is available to review. Your zone is changing.

Know your zone- look up your property using the interactive online mapping.

A tracked change version of the draft zoning bylaw released in November 2021 is also available.

A companion Official Plan Amendment is also be introduced to adjust the land use designations of specific properties to better reflect existing uses, built form, and zoning permissions. The proposed OPA introduces a site-specific policy that recognizes existing density permissions on some lands within the city and proposes to redesignate site-specific properties from low-density residential to medium-density residential, high-density residential, and Mixed/Office commercial to better reflect the existing built form and uses.

Open house - In person!

Wednesday, July 6

2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m.

This is an in-person open house, taking place in the Galleria at City Hall, 1 Carden Street, Guelph.

A statutory public meeting will follow. The purpose of this public meeting is to share information about the proposed Zoning Bylaw and Official Plan Amendment and consider public comments. The public meeting will take place as follows:

Public Meeting

Wednesday, July 13, 6 p.m.

This is a hybrid City Council meeting that can be watched online at guelph.ca/live or in-person in Council Chambers, 1 Carden Street, Guelph.

No decision will be made during this public meeting. Council will make its decision on the proposed bylaw at a future meeting.

Email zoningreview@guelph.ca to ask questions, provide comments, get more information, or set up a virtual meeting with the Project Manager.

Know Your Zone

The proposed new zoning bylaw is now available for review.

Important note: The zoning bylaw only applies to properties within the City of Guelph. It does not affect properties in Guelph Eramosa Township or the Township of Puslinch.

We have written a new zoning bylaw that aligns with the City’s updated Official Plan, reflects contemporary zoning practices and works for you and your neighbours today and in the future. Really, we’re making sure all the pieces fit together to support our shared vision for growth as laid out in the Official Plan through a new set of rules.

The zoning bylaw sets out rules for all properties in the city, including rules for:

  • how a property can be used
  • the size of a property
  • where buildings can go on a property
  • how tall, what size, and how many buildings can be built
  • the number of parking spaces and where the spaces are located

We have looked at each and every property in Guelph—each residential, commercial, and industrial property, all City-owned and private property, everything, and the proposed new zoning bylaw is available to review. Your zone is changing.

Know your zone- look up your property using the interactive online mapping.

A tracked change version of the draft zoning bylaw released in November 2021 is also available.

A companion Official Plan Amendment is also be introduced to adjust the land use designations of specific properties to better reflect existing uses, built form, and zoning permissions. The proposed OPA introduces a site-specific policy that recognizes existing density permissions on some lands within the city and proposes to redesignate site-specific properties from low-density residential to medium-density residential, high-density residential, and Mixed/Office commercial to better reflect the existing built form and uses.

Open house - In person!

Wednesday, July 6

2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m.

This is an in-person open house, taking place in the Galleria at City Hall, 1 Carden Street, Guelph.

A statutory public meeting will follow. The purpose of this public meeting is to share information about the proposed Zoning Bylaw and Official Plan Amendment and consider public comments. The public meeting will take place as follows:

Public Meeting

Wednesday, July 13, 6 p.m.

This is a hybrid City Council meeting that can be watched online at guelph.ca/live or in-person in Council Chambers, 1 Carden Street, Guelph.

No decision will be made during this public meeting. Council will make its decision on the proposed bylaw at a future meeting.

Email zoningreview@guelph.ca to ask questions, provide comments, get more information, or set up a virtual meeting with the Project Manager.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Do you have a question about zoning in the City of Guelph? We want you to know zoning. It is important. Please, ask us anything. 

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    A general question applying to many properties in the south end - In reviewing the H13 provisions on newly up-zoned development sites on Gordon Street, the City requirements are very limited in scope, i.e., municipal engineering services only. How are the considerations in a 'complete development application' as outlined in the Official Plan section 10.18 being implemented? e.g., sustainability objectives (ix) respecting climate change; protection of adjacent lands natural heritage features (i) and cultural heritage resources (vi).

    prk asked 7 months ago

    The H13 holding provision has been applied to properties where the draft zoning bylaw proposes to increase the height and density permissions. The holding provision is to ensure that there are adequate and available municipal services (water and wastewater) prior to development proceeding. The purpose of pre-zoning lands to the maximum height and density anticipated in the Official Plan is to reduce the need for a site-specific zoning amendment application.

    The City’s sustainability objectives, respect for climate change, protection of the natural heritage system and cultural heritage resources is foundational to all City’s plans, including the Official Plan. The draft zoning bylaw includes several regulations to implement Official Plan policy, such as a minimum percentage of landscaped open space, buffer strips, setbacks, minimum separation distances between buildings, the new Natural Heritage System (NHS) zone that does not permit development, and reduced parking requirements in some areas to promote active transportation and ensure an oversupply of parking and asphalt does not occur.  

    In addition, any new development (excluding single detached, semi-detached dwellings and on-street townhouses) are required to go through the Site Plan Control process under Section 41 of the Planning Act. 

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    What happens if the new bylaw is passed and an existing structure (dwelling, driveway, fence, other) is suddenly not in compliance? Will these be allowed to remain? Is every property in the city going to be effectively "audited" for compliance with the new bylaw?

    Maurena asked 7 months ago

    Yes existing structures that are in compliance with the current zoning bylaw rules will be allowed to remain. Under Section 1.4 of the new draft zoning bylaw nothing in the bylaw will prevent the use of any land, building or structure that was lawfully used for such purpose prior to the effective date of this bylaw, so long as it continues to be used for that purpose.

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    I want to know where these facts come from or are they assumptions? “ Caron pointed to a “demographic shift” on the horizon as young adults opt not to own vehicles, even electric ones. As a result, fewer parking spaces will be needed in the years to come, she suggested.”. That is in the future and does not address the needs today. Many families through vivid and prior have a need for more than two cars in their driveway as kids have moved hime and for some don’t leave due to housing prices etc. that is the now that needs addressing not the future with fewer cars etc. which to me is an assumption only and if we built our infrastructure on what ifs and assumptions this city will fall apart and be the worst place to live and no one will want to live here.

    ConcernedCitizenofGuelph asked 8 months ago

    The City continuously monitors transportation changes and makes incremental updates overtime to align our policies, plans and regulations with ongoing trends. As part of developing draft parking regulations for the zoning bylaw, our review looked at goals and objectives of the City’s Official Plan, the priorities of the City’s Strategic Plan, the work being undertaken as part of the City’s Transportation Master Plan Update, as well as other City plans and guidelines. In addition, a Guelph Parking Standards Review Phase 2 Discussion Paper was developed by IBI Group to support parking regulation changes. 

    The parking discussion paper looked at the City’s existing parking rules, trends in other municipalities, parking standards from the Institute of Transportation Engineers and the results of a parking demand survey undertaken for a range of locations within the City of Guelph to develop recommendations for Guelph’s zoning bylaw.

    The Transportation Master Plan Update is exploring transportation options to make Guelph move better and achieve a safe, efficient and reliable system for everyone as the city continues to grow. The master plan update recommends changes reflective of our community vision that balance mobility, environment and efficiency while prioritizing safety and access for all travellers; and explore how new and evolving technologies and travel services will shape the future of transportation in Guelph. 

    The Changing Transportation System User City of Guelph Transportation Master Plan Background Paper Series was produced as part of the Transportation Master Plan Update. This paper is part of a series of background papers intended to communicate information, key trends, and concepts to inform the strategic direction for our updated Transportation Master Plan. The paper discusses factors influencing travel behaviour and transportation user trends including changing demographics and the declining popularity of cars.

    All of this data helps us develop reasonable parking scenarios for Guelph in the future. 

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    I’m concerned and not in agreement with the proposed reduction in parking spaces for the residential zones and mixed use zones particularly along an intensified area. I’m not clear on the purpose or benefit of decreasing current allowable parking, visitor parking or accessible parking spaces for future deveopments. Who does this benefit except the developer?

    Helen Artuso asked 8 months ago

    Intensification areas, known as Intensification Corridors and Community Mixed-use Nodes in the City’s Official Plan, are planned to provide a mix of land uses at higher densities that are transit supportive. Intensification Corridors are directed and oriented toward major roads and are in proximity to transit services. Community Mixed-use Nodes in the long term are designed as urban villages and are to be well served by transit and facilitate pedestrian and cycling traffic. In other words, intensification areas offer more choices for how to get around. The mixed-use nature of intensification areas also offers the potential for shared parking in which spaces needed for daytime use such as a medical office can be used for evening use such as a residence. Justification for the geographic based approach is provided in the Guelph Parking Standards Review Phase 2 Discussion Paper developed by IBI Group.

    The number of accessible parking spaces required within intensification areas will not decrease. 

    You can see what properties are within these intensification areas by reviewing the online mapping. You will see a (PA) following a zone symbol on a property that has the parking adjustment. 

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    How can you reduce further the amounts of parking required, when there is already a crazy shortage in the south end. The apartments on Poppy Drive, Kay Cres, don’t have enough as is. They are all parking on Poppy Drive, Dallan Drive/ side streets. Lined off full. Now winter is coming and there is 5-10 posts a day looking to rent spots in peoples driveways. It’s a mess!

    bobbi1977 asked 8 months ago

    The proposed parking rates have been recommended based on the Guelph Parking Standards Review Phase 2 Discussion Paper developed by IBI Group. A geographic parking approach has been proposed that slightly reduces parking rates within the City’s intensification areas. These areas are planned to provide a mix of land uses at higher densities that are transit supportive and offer more choices for how to get around. The mixed-use nature of intensification areas also offers the potential for shared parking in which spaces needed for daytime use such as a medical office can be used for evening use such as a residence. 

    The Poppy Drive/Kay Crescent/Dallan Drive area is not identified within the parking reduction area. The proposed bylaw slightly reduces the minimum parking requirement for apartment buildings based on the parking demand survey that was conducted in Guelph and adds clarity to visitor parking spaces requirements. Parking rates for on-street and cluster townhouse development remains the same as the existing bylaw requirements except that visitor parking space requirements have been included to add clarity to the bylaw.  

    You can see what properties are within these intensification areas by reviewing the online mapping. You will find a (PA) following a zone symbol on a property that has the parking adjustment.

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    why is paving a sidewalk down both sides of a double wide driveway allowed, and then park or store vehicles on it year round, permitted, but I as a howeowner am not allowed to widen my driveway to the size I want? I just need to add two sidewalks instead?

    confused howeowner asked 7 months ago

    The existing and proposed zoning bylaw regulates the maximum width of a driveway based on a zone and do not allow a sidewalk on both sides of a driveway to be added and parked on. Regulation 5.11.3 (b) of the draft zoning bylaw allows a surfaced walkway within 1.5 metres of the nearest foundation wall provided it is not used for parking. This permitted walkway is intended to lead to the front entrance of the residence and is not large enough to be parked on.

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    What is the reason for limiting the size of garage? This does not support the climate change initiative of switching to electric vehicles, energy will be saved in warming up vehicles in winter. Also; 20% have spaces in apartment buildings for electric vehicles will not be enough in the near future as the internal combustion engine is to be fazed out by 2035.

    Mark A asked 7 months ago

    The maximum width of an attached residential garage is aligned with the urban design policies contained within the City’s Official Plan. The draft regulations limit the size to 50% of the dwelling width or a prescribed amount based on the zone and dwelling type, whichever is less. Please see Table 5.8 in the draft zoning bylaw for details. The maximum garage width is proposed to ensure garages do not dominate the street scape in new development and promote eyes on the street.

    The requirement for 20% of required parking spaces for apartment buildings and mixed-use buildings to be electric vehicle spaces is a minimum for lots generally within an intensification area (areas identified with a Parking Adjustment (PA) suffix). In addition, a minimum of 80% of required parking spaces for apartment buildings, townhouses (cluster, staked, stacked back-to-back) and mixed-use buildings must provide designed electric vehicle parking spaces. In other words, a parking space designed and constructed to be electric vehicle ready, allowing for the future installation of electronic vehicle supply equipment. Please see draft regulation 5.9 for details. The requirements for electric vehicle parking are a new addition to the zoning bylaw and the ratios have been recommended based on the Guelph Parking Standards Review Phase 2 Discussion Paper developed by IBI Group.

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    Are there provisions for multi-generational households?

    Rosco asked 7 months ago

    Yes. Although we don’t zone for specific types of households the City does support a range and mix of residential dwelling types to meet the needs of various household types, including multi-generational households. The City continues to place no limits on the number of bedrooms in a primary residential dwelling. In addition, the draft bylaw increases the flexibility of low density residential zones by permitting both single detached dwellings and semi-detached dwelling units as-of-right. One of the low density residential zones also permits duplexes (RL.1). The City is also carrying forward the rules for additional residential dwelling units approved by Council in December 2020. These rules permit an additional residential dwelling unit within a primary residential dwelling (single detached, semi-detached, duplex, on-street townhouse) and within a separate building on the same lot as the primary residential dwelling, where regulations can be met. In effect three residential dwelling units are permitted on the same lot.

Page last updated: 16 Jun 2022, 01:48 PM