Our Food Future: 50 x 50 x 50 by 2025

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Consultation has concluded

Imagine a food system where there’s no such thing
as waste and where every citizen has access to
the healthy, nutritious food they need. Imagine a
living lab that promotes collaboration between
food entrepreneurs, farmers, researchers and social
innovators—and a rural-urban partnership that
leverages smart technology to make it all possible.
A global transformation has begun—and Guelph/
Wellington aims to lead the way. Help us create the
food community of the future.

Imagine a food system where there’s no such thing as waste and where everyone has access to the healthy, nutritious food they need.

Imagine a living lab that promotes collaboration between food entrepreneurs, farmers, researchers and social innovators — and a rural-urban partnership that leverages smart technology to make it all possible.

A global transformation has begun — and Guelph/Wellington aims to lead the way. Our goal is to become Canada's first technology-enabled circular food economy.

Food is a fundamental requirement of life and the basic structure of today's linear "take-make-dispose" food system is unsustainable economically, socially and environmentally. By fostering a rural-urban partnership and bringing the food system and communities back into healthy balance, we hope to achieve our bold vision of 50 x 50 x 50 by 2025:

  • 50% increase in access to affordable, nutritious food;
  • 50 new food businesses and collaboration opportunities; and
  • 50% increase in economic revenues by reducing and reimagining our food waste.

Guelph/Wellington has been named a finalist in Infrastructure Canada’s Smart Cities Challenge, and together we have a chance to win $10 million to put our vision into action. Help us create the food community of the future — Our Food Future.

Imagine a food system where there’s no such thing as waste and where everyone has access to the healthy, nutritious food they need.

Imagine a living lab that promotes collaboration between food entrepreneurs, farmers, researchers and social innovators — and a rural-urban partnership that leverages smart technology to make it all possible.

A global transformation has begun — and Guelph/Wellington aims to lead the way. Our goal is to become Canada's first technology-enabled circular food economy.

Food is a fundamental requirement of life and the basic structure of today's linear "take-make-dispose" food system is unsustainable economically, socially and environmentally. By fostering a rural-urban partnership and bringing the food system and communities back into healthy balance, we hope to achieve our bold vision of 50 x 50 x 50 by 2025:

  • 50% increase in access to affordable, nutritious food;
  • 50 new food businesses and collaboration opportunities; and
  • 50% increase in economic revenues by reducing and reimagining our food waste.

Guelph/Wellington has been named a finalist in Infrastructure Canada’s Smart Cities Challenge, and together we have a chance to win $10 million to put our vision into action. Help us create the food community of the future — Our Food Future.

Tell your story

Do you have a story about challenges accessing nutritious food? 

Do you have a story about a food innovation that makes a difference?

Do you know of a person or an organization who are working to take food waste out of the equation? Are you? 

Tell us the story. 

Girls at a farm

Thanks for telling us your story and helping Guelph create a circular food economy. 

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

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    Crystal's Story

    by Smart Cities Team, over 2 years ago

    During our workstream meetings, we receive input from and collaborate with organizations and individuals on how to meet our Smart Cities Goals. One of our workstream members, Crystal Ellis, writes about Hillsburgh Commercial Community Kitchen, an initiative aligned with the Goals:

    “Hillsburgh Commercial Community Kitchen in the new Hillsburgh Library – a partnership between the Wellington County Library and County Economic Development to build a kitchen space to rent to community, public and business. Visited last week and there was a local entrepreneur using the space to produce her product. The space is an accessible price point to rent, has... Continue reading

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    Tyler's Story

    by Smart Cities Team, over 2 years ago

    During our workstream meetings, we receive input from and collaborate with organizations and individuals on how to meet our Smart Cities Goals. In a written reflection, one of our workstream members, Tyler Whale, shared the following story about his family's relationship with the concept of a circular food economy:

    "For generations, my family farm has invested in improving their land. Maintaining forests, being efficient with inputs (near ‘organic’ farm) planting tree lines to prevent erosion, etc.. Recently, they invested in an Anaerobic Digester that can create enough power for 7 farms their size. My brother also created a cooperative (Cornerstone... Continue reading

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    How we can all get involved: A university student's story and perspective

    by HeatherB, over 2 years ago

                I am a 4th year undergraduate student at the University of Guelph. I study agriculture, so my interest in the City of Guelph’s “Our Food Future” proposal for the Smart Cities challenge makes sense! I am sharing my story of how I came to be involved in the submission of the final proposal, the chance to receive $10 million to implement the city’s plan for a circular food economy in Guelph-Wellington.

                One of the main steps in developing the proposal is community engagement. There are many types of communities to engage, including small businesses, industries, policymakers, researchers and city residents... Continue reading

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