College Avenue Protected Cycling

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About the project

There are new protected cycling lanes coming to College Avenue from the Janefield Avenue to Dundas Lane. The project includes two types of protected cycling lanes as well as protected intersections and protected bus stops.

Construction of Phase 1 is expected to begin in May from just west of Edinburgh Road to University Avenue West. The work is expected to be completed by August 2024. Detour routes for cars, transit and cycling can be accesses in the phase one construction detour route maps.

Construction includes cycle tracks along this 550m stretch of College Avenue, a protected intersection at Edinburgh Road, and upgrades to the existing watermain. Learn more about the project here.

Protected cycling lanes can help people of all ages feel safer and more comfortable not only biking along College Avenue but also walking, rolling and driving.

If you have participated in engagement for Moving Guelph Forward, the Transportation Master Plan or the Protected Cycling Network Study you may notice how this project responds to community feedback we received to created connected, quality cycling infrastructure in Guelph.

How to Participate

Our engagement concluded on this project in 2023. While we are not asking for feedback about this project, we are moving forward with construction and we do want to keep you informed. If you have questions about the project or the construction we want you to be able to ask them and to get answers. Use the question tool below to ask us about the project.

About the project

There are new protected cycling lanes coming to College Avenue from the Janefield Avenue to Dundas Lane. The project includes two types of protected cycling lanes as well as protected intersections and protected bus stops.

Construction of Phase 1 is expected to begin in May from just west of Edinburgh Road to University Avenue West. The work is expected to be completed by August 2024. Detour routes for cars, transit and cycling can be accesses in the phase one construction detour route maps.

Construction includes cycle tracks along this 550m stretch of College Avenue, a protected intersection at Edinburgh Road, and upgrades to the existing watermain. Learn more about the project here.

Protected cycling lanes can help people of all ages feel safer and more comfortable not only biking along College Avenue but also walking, rolling and driving.

If you have participated in engagement for Moving Guelph Forward, the Transportation Master Plan or the Protected Cycling Network Study you may notice how this project responds to community feedback we received to created connected, quality cycling infrastructure in Guelph.

How to Participate

Our engagement concluded on this project in 2023. While we are not asking for feedback about this project, we are moving forward with construction and we do want to keep you informed. If you have questions about the project or the construction we want you to be able to ask them and to get answers. Use the question tool below to ask us about the project.

Ask us anything!

Have a look at the presentation materials and if you have any questions ask us here. We will do our best to answer within three business days. 

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  • Share Will the bike signals have an orange phase and turn red at the same time as the vehicle signal or before the vehicle signal? on Facebook Share Will the bike signals have an orange phase and turn red at the same time as the vehicle signal or before the vehicle signal? on Twitter Share Will the bike signals have an orange phase and turn red at the same time as the vehicle signal or before the vehicle signal? on Linkedin Email Will the bike signals have an orange phase and turn red at the same time as the vehicle signal or before the vehicle signal? link

    Will the bike signals have an orange phase and turn red at the same time as the vehicle signal or before the vehicle signal?

    Shanepu asked 7 months ago

    Hi there! The bike signals will have an orange phase, yes. Timing for the red phase depends on several design factors that are not yet known. If you have questions about bike signals in Guelph, please email traffic@guelph.ca. Thank you!

  • Share I am not sure why money is wasted on this project. Bicycles ignore the pretty green paint and the signals and go where they want. How does this help... on Facebook Share I am not sure why money is wasted on this project. Bicycles ignore the pretty green paint and the signals and go where they want. How does this help... on Twitter Share I am not sure why money is wasted on this project. Bicycles ignore the pretty green paint and the signals and go where they want. How does this help... on Linkedin Email I am not sure why money is wasted on this project. Bicycles ignore the pretty green paint and the signals and go where they want. How does this help... link

    I am not sure why money is wasted on this project. Bicycles ignore the pretty green paint and the signals and go where they want. How does this help...

    Ka asked 7 months ago

    Unfortunately we don't see perfect behaviour from any type of traveler. People walking, cycling and driving all sometimes break the rules. This infrastructure provides people who bike with a designated, safe space to ride which will help with compliance. We sometimes see sidewalk riding where there is no cycling infrastructure available, or people do not feel safe using the on-road bike lanes because of fast moving, high volume vehicle traffic. Enhanced conditions for biking will be mean better adherence and more people on bikes. This project is directed by the council-approved Transportation Master Plan, in order to assist with the meeting the City's 2050 net zero carbon goals. 

  • Share When will Edinburgh receive a bike lane? This is one of the 3 main arteries to travel from North to South. Many cyclists have to ride on the sidewalk, on a busy road or take a detour on side streets (making travel longer and more difficult). These are the reasons that are preventing people from biking more often. More cyclists will mean less traffic congestion and safer roads. Also, why is the City Of Guelph putting speed bumps in bike lanes? This is extremely dangerous. on Facebook Share When will Edinburgh receive a bike lane? This is one of the 3 main arteries to travel from North to South. Many cyclists have to ride on the sidewalk, on a busy road or take a detour on side streets (making travel longer and more difficult). These are the reasons that are preventing people from biking more often. More cyclists will mean less traffic congestion and safer roads. Also, why is the City Of Guelph putting speed bumps in bike lanes? This is extremely dangerous. on Twitter Share When will Edinburgh receive a bike lane? This is one of the 3 main arteries to travel from North to South. Many cyclists have to ride on the sidewalk, on a busy road or take a detour on side streets (making travel longer and more difficult). These are the reasons that are preventing people from biking more often. More cyclists will mean less traffic congestion and safer roads. Also, why is the City Of Guelph putting speed bumps in bike lanes? This is extremely dangerous. on Linkedin Email When will Edinburgh receive a bike lane? This is one of the 3 main arteries to travel from North to South. Many cyclists have to ride on the sidewalk, on a busy road or take a detour on side streets (making travel longer and more difficult). These are the reasons that are preventing people from biking more often. More cyclists will mean less traffic congestion and safer roads. Also, why is the City Of Guelph putting speed bumps in bike lanes? This is extremely dangerous. link

    When will Edinburgh receive a bike lane? This is one of the 3 main arteries to travel from North to South. Many cyclists have to ride on the sidewalk, on a busy road or take a detour on side streets (making travel longer and more difficult). These are the reasons that are preventing people from biking more often. More cyclists will mean less traffic congestion and safer roads. Also, why is the City Of Guelph putting speed bumps in bike lanes? This is extremely dangerous.

    Mat S asked 7 months ago

    Hi Mat, thanks for your question! When implementing new infrastructure, staff take direction from Council-approved documents such as the 2013 Cycling Master Plan and 2022 Transportation Master Plan. Neither of these direct staff to pursue cycling infrastructure on Edinburgh Road, north of Kortright Road. We acknowledge that parallel routes are not always as convenient. The Cycling Master Plan will be updated starting in 2025, and will provide the opportunity for community feedback and Council consideration of future bike lane projects. 

    When implementing traffic calming measures such as speed cushions, Staff make every effort possible to avoid placing these measures in bike lanes. There are locations where the width of the road means that people driving could evade speed cushions by entering the bike lane. This creates further safety concerns, and is the only time speed cushions are placed in bike lanes. 

  • Share This is a step forward for cycling infrastructure. However getting to College along Edinburgh Road is not a comfortable ride. Is there any plan for infrastructure similar to this along this road? on Facebook Share This is a step forward for cycling infrastructure. However getting to College along Edinburgh Road is not a comfortable ride. Is there any plan for infrastructure similar to this along this road? on Twitter Share This is a step forward for cycling infrastructure. However getting to College along Edinburgh Road is not a comfortable ride. Is there any plan for infrastructure similar to this along this road? on Linkedin Email This is a step forward for cycling infrastructure. However getting to College along Edinburgh Road is not a comfortable ride. Is there any plan for infrastructure similar to this along this road? link

    This is a step forward for cycling infrastructure. However getting to College along Edinburgh Road is not a comfortable ride. Is there any plan for infrastructure similar to this along this road?

    Mike S asked 7 months ago

    Hi, thanks for your question! When implementing new infrastructure, staff take direction from the 2013 Cycling Master Plan and 2022 Transportation Master Plan. Neither of these council-approved documents direct staff to pursue cycling infrastructure on Edinburgh Road, north of Kortright. However, we are working on developing parallel routes. To the east there is a signed route that helps cyclists travel through Old University parallel to Edinburgh using quiet side streets, and to the west the Active Transportation Network uses off-road trails and multi-use paths as an alternative to Edinburgh. South of College we are working on adding cycling lanes to Scottsdale Avenue and eventually will be upgrading Gordon Street's on-road bike lanes to protected cycling paths, as directed by the Guelph Protected Cycling Network Study.

  • Share How wide will the cycle tracks and protected bike lanes be? Will they be wide enough to allow safe passing and for 2 cyclists to ride abreast? on Facebook Share How wide will the cycle tracks and protected bike lanes be? Will they be wide enough to allow safe passing and for 2 cyclists to ride abreast? on Twitter Share How wide will the cycle tracks and protected bike lanes be? Will they be wide enough to allow safe passing and for 2 cyclists to ride abreast? on Linkedin Email How wide will the cycle tracks and protected bike lanes be? Will they be wide enough to allow safe passing and for 2 cyclists to ride abreast? link

    How wide will the cycle tracks and protected bike lanes be? Will they be wide enough to allow safe passing and for 2 cyclists to ride abreast?

    CTrain232 asked 7 months ago

    Hey there, thanks for your question. In most places the bike paths in the project area will be 2.0 meters wide. This should permit users to safely pass one another. In some sections where pedestrian interactions are more likely to occur, the paths will narrow to 1.5 or even 1.2 meters to help remind cyclists to slow down and yield the right of way.

Page last updated: 03 May 2024, 09:01 AM