Guelph Transit Route Review

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Guelph Transit started a full operational route review of its transit network in 2019 to look at individual routes and frequency to meet current and future customer needs, and to identify potential opportunities to move from its current system that requires customers to transfer buses at a central hub to a more grid-like system with direct routes.

The route review was approved by City Council as part of the Guelph Transit Business Service Review recommendations in 2019.

The route review outcomes were informed by data collection (e.g. ridership and stop activity data, and route-by-route on-time performance), industry best practices, and employee and public input.

The proposed transit system is a blended model that includes transit hubs, express routes, and routes that follow the city’s spine in a grid pattern as well as outer perimeter. It’s designed to get people to where they want to go with more route types (e.g. core, base, university express, on-demand, and industrial express), faster travel times, frequent service, and service reliability.

What we’re proposing for transit over the next decade allows us to deliver a more competitive, convenient, and reliable transit system that meets the community’s needs today and beyond. It also moves us closer to meeting goals set out in the City’s Strategic Plan by improving connectivity of the whole transportation system—making it easy for people to travel within city limits.

Learn more about the proposed transit system

  • Watch an 8 minute video explaining how we got here and how to find the route details you are looking for
  • Read our summary document to get a high-level idea of the changes being proposed
  • Read our more detailed Proposed Transit System document to find all of route-by-route and year-by-year details, including propose changes to routes and schedules.
  • Explore the proposed routes by year in our interactive map
  • Attend one of two virtual town halls to learn from our project leads directly (see the details below)

This consultation is now closed.

Next steps

This latest round of employee and community input will be used to refine the proposed transit system and implementation plan, before it is presented to Council for consideration on November 3, 2021. Details on funding the initiative over 10 years will also be shared with Council as part of the City budget process.

Guelph Transit started a full operational route review of its transit network in 2019 to look at individual routes and frequency to meet current and future customer needs, and to identify potential opportunities to move from its current system that requires customers to transfer buses at a central hub to a more grid-like system with direct routes.

The route review was approved by City Council as part of the Guelph Transit Business Service Review recommendations in 2019.

The route review outcomes were informed by data collection (e.g. ridership and stop activity data, and route-by-route on-time performance), industry best practices, and employee and public input.

The proposed transit system is a blended model that includes transit hubs, express routes, and routes that follow the city’s spine in a grid pattern as well as outer perimeter. It’s designed to get people to where they want to go with more route types (e.g. core, base, university express, on-demand, and industrial express), faster travel times, frequent service, and service reliability.

What we’re proposing for transit over the next decade allows us to deliver a more competitive, convenient, and reliable transit system that meets the community’s needs today and beyond. It also moves us closer to meeting goals set out in the City’s Strategic Plan by improving connectivity of the whole transportation system—making it easy for people to travel within city limits.

Learn more about the proposed transit system

  • Watch an 8 minute video explaining how we got here and how to find the route details you are looking for
  • Read our summary document to get a high-level idea of the changes being proposed
  • Read our more detailed Proposed Transit System document to find all of route-by-route and year-by-year details, including propose changes to routes and schedules.
  • Explore the proposed routes by year in our interactive map
  • Attend one of two virtual town halls to learn from our project leads directly (see the details below)

This consultation is now closed.

Next steps

This latest round of employee and community input will be used to refine the proposed transit system and implementation plan, before it is presented to Council for consideration on November 3, 2021. Details on funding the initiative over 10 years will also be shared with Council as part of the City budget process.

Ask us a question

We are an open book. Ask us about the proposed transit system and we will be sure to respond within three business days.

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    In year 4, Route 20 goes to 20 minute service but the following year you split the route into 3 different routes and reduced the frequency to every 30 minutes all day. Is this due to the funding from the federal government or is there away to skip the 20 minute service and go straight into the 3 new routes

    3 months ago

    This question was asked at the June 16 town hall.

    Answer: The Route 20 undergoes these incremental changes to allow for a more gradual modification to the service. However, if it is desirable and feasible, skipping ahead to having Route 20, 21, and 22 implemented earlier is something that would be considered.

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    250m is a bit low for stop spacing, especially on core routes and major arterial roads. Would recommend 400m on those roads, and/or prioritization to be located near safe pedestrian crossings.

    3 months ago

    This question was asked at the June 16 town hall.

    Answer: 250m is the average distance along a route - it could be more or less than 250m depending on the road layout. This is the standard number used in the MTO’s Transit Supportive Guidelines. New stops are prioritized in safe locations that connect to destinations in the city.

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    Asked at the June 16 town hall: Although Route 19 was approved, the residents don't feel the 2019 communication is/was transparent. Can The City review this in greater detail? A few plans along Hanlon Creek were suggested and would accommodate the requests.

    3 months ago

    Door hangers were placed on every door of every house along Teal Drive, as well as other possible route locations along Milson Crescent in consultation in 2019. The route that received the most positive feedback is the routing presented as part of the Route Review. The majority of respondents indicated that a route along Teal Drive would greatly benefit them. However, we continue to monitor feedback and evaluate alternatives.

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    Asked at the June 16 town hall: Has Guelph Transit reached out to major employers regarding its proposal to have industrial expresses paid for by companies? What is the thinking behind this option and is there examples from other places?

    3 months ago

    While the proposal of Industrial Express Routes has not been discussed with employers, Guelph Transit engaged with major employers late last year/early this year on how transit can best serve them. Industrial Express Routes take the idea behind corporate initiatives like discounted bus passes a step further to provide a customized or premium service for employees. Major employers indicated that they are very supportive of improving transit, and many stated that as they are part of the community, they want to help in any way they can. Industrial Express Routes will be explored with employers further once the route review has gone through Council approval.

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    Asked at the June 16 town hall: Wondering if there is an opportunity for an east-west crosstown route through Downtown Guelph by combining routes. i.e. Routes 4 and 10 or Routes 10 and 14

    3 months ago

    Yes. The preliminary designs of the network had Routes 4 and 10 shown as one route. 

    These 2 routes are shown separately in this plan to allow for flexibility, should we decide we want to connect different routes or alter service levels, dependent on public feedback and available budget.

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    Asked at the June 16 town hall: Will there be ways to transfer mid route avoiding major hubs?

    3 months ago

    Yes. There are much more crosstown connections, more routes intersect at major intersections, and run at higher frequencies. While we haven’t scheduled the routes yet, we would do what we can to make on-street connections as convenient as possible.

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    Asked at the June 16 town hall: In year 8, route 7 will add Kortright east from Gordon to Victoria. This stretch has speed bumps, and the a 30 km zone and cement medians, installed for traffic calming. Will these measures be removed to accommodate the bus route?

    3 months ago

    We would not be removing any traffic calming in this area. Buses are able to straddle the existing speed bumps, and our buses travel at the speed limit. We have some routes that currently operate in neighbourhoods with similar conditions.

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    Asked at the June 16 town hall: Can you explain how the Route Review will connect with the Transportation Master Plan and the upcoming Transit Master Plan/ This will be important for Council to see the "forest for the trees" i.e. the whole concept together.

    3 months ago

    All plans are guided by the City’s Strategic Plan. The TMP, Route Review, and Guelph Transit Master Plan all fall under the pillar of Navigating Our Future, with the goal of improving connectivity for the entire transportation network. The TMP is the highest level document, providing guidance for all modes of transportation, and supports the idea of higher quality transit. The Route Review adheres to the principles within the TMP, and the Route Review will be one piece of the ultimate Guelph Transit Master Plan. The Guelph Transit Master Plan will encompass all of Guelph Transit’s long-term business strategies. 

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    Asked at the June 16 town hall: Is there away to better understand the financial impacts of shortening the plan to say 6, 7, 8, 9 years or do we need to wait for this to come back at budget time?

    3 months ago

    The order and timing of changes will not affect the ultimate cost of the system, but it will impact the yearly impact on taxes - we need to decide if we want to spend the money today, or a few years down the line. It will need to be evaluated how a faster or slower timeline will impact both the transit experience, and the yearly increase in taxes.

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    Asked at the June 16 town hall: Has any thought been given to combine say Route 20 and 22 to create more industrial connections at the Woodlawn SmartCentre routes?

    3 months ago

    There are some limitations of how these routes can be combined or connected due to the nature of the road network, but any feedback we receive will be considered.

Page last updated: 21 June 2021, 06:41