Cycling Network Study

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Help create a connected cycling network for riders of all ages and abilities

The first round of Community Engagement is now complete. We’re reviewing your feedback and developing conceptual designs, which will be shared for comment in late Spring 2022.

We’re looking to create a protected cycling network in Guelph that will help all riders feel comfortable biking along key streets in the city while connecting large parts of our community. To help us get started, we’d like your input on what this may look like.

As part of this study, we’ll develop conceptual designs for 13 kilometres of “AAA” (all ages and abilities) protected cycling facilities along three corridors that provide safe, continuous connections for cycling and micro-mobility, such as scooters, to and from community destinations and major transit stops. This study will look at:

  • Eramosa Road between Woolwich Street to Victoria Road (Study Area A)
  • Gordon Street between Waterloo Avenue to Clair Road (Study Area B*)
  • College Avenue between Janefield Avenue to Dundas Lane (Study Area C)


Map of Guelph outlining the three study areasStudy area map - click for full size

The study objectives are to develop conceptual designs that provide safe, continuous cycling and micro-mobility connections to and from major community destinations, including major transit stops.

Design Options

With contributions from residents and key stakeholders, our design team will review key destinations, connections, constraints and “pinch-points” along the study area corridors. Five separate design concept options will be prepared for each of the three study areas and an evaluation, and further public engagement, will determine which of the options will be recommended for each corridor.

The five options that will be prepared for each corridor include:

Do Nothing: Keep things as they are.

Cycle track: One-way, located outside the curbs of the roadway, often next to the sidewalk, physically separating people on bikes from motor vehicle traffic

Multi-use path: Two-way shared pedestrian and cycling facility, physically separated from motor vehicle traffic, often located similarly to a sidewalk, but larger in size to accommodate both pedestrians and cyclists

Protected bike lane: One-way, same level as the roadway, physical separation between people riding bikes and motor vehicle traffic with materials such as curbs, bollards, or planter boxes

Hybrid approach: A hybrid of the design options described above as appropriate for the corridor.

Note: The above graphic representations are being used as examples only, to show what physically protected bike facilities can look like. These are not the proposed configurations for any of the roads under study.

*Study Area B has a gap between Lowes and Edinburgh, where the Gordon Street Improvements Environmental Assessment took place. That project involved the design of protected bike facilities, which the Cycling Network Study will tie into. This will create a seamless protected cycling facility on Gordon from Downtown to the South End of Guelph.

Have Your Say

Care about road safety in Guelph? Travel along Eramosa, Gordon, and College? Would you like to start cycling or do you want to cycle more, but need more comfortable cycling routes? Are you an avid cyclist with something to say about bike infrastructure design? We need all of your perspectives to help inform the design of a new cycling network for our city.

Please join the conversation by participating below.

Help create a connected cycling network for riders of all ages and abilities

The first round of Community Engagement is now complete. We’re reviewing your feedback and developing conceptual designs, which will be shared for comment in late Spring 2022.

We’re looking to create a protected cycling network in Guelph that will help all riders feel comfortable biking along key streets in the city while connecting large parts of our community. To help us get started, we’d like your input on what this may look like.

As part of this study, we’ll develop conceptual designs for 13 kilometres of “AAA” (all ages and abilities) protected cycling facilities along three corridors that provide safe, continuous connections for cycling and micro-mobility, such as scooters, to and from community destinations and major transit stops. This study will look at:

  • Eramosa Road between Woolwich Street to Victoria Road (Study Area A)
  • Gordon Street between Waterloo Avenue to Clair Road (Study Area B*)
  • College Avenue between Janefield Avenue to Dundas Lane (Study Area C)


Map of Guelph outlining the three study areasStudy area map - click for full size

The study objectives are to develop conceptual designs that provide safe, continuous cycling and micro-mobility connections to and from major community destinations, including major transit stops.

Design Options

With contributions from residents and key stakeholders, our design team will review key destinations, connections, constraints and “pinch-points” along the study area corridors. Five separate design concept options will be prepared for each of the three study areas and an evaluation, and further public engagement, will determine which of the options will be recommended for each corridor.

The five options that will be prepared for each corridor include:

Do Nothing: Keep things as they are.

Cycle track: One-way, located outside the curbs of the roadway, often next to the sidewalk, physically separating people on bikes from motor vehicle traffic

Multi-use path: Two-way shared pedestrian and cycling facility, physically separated from motor vehicle traffic, often located similarly to a sidewalk, but larger in size to accommodate both pedestrians and cyclists

Protected bike lane: One-way, same level as the roadway, physical separation between people riding bikes and motor vehicle traffic with materials such as curbs, bollards, or planter boxes

Hybrid approach: A hybrid of the design options described above as appropriate for the corridor.

Note: The above graphic representations are being used as examples only, to show what physically protected bike facilities can look like. These are not the proposed configurations for any of the roads under study.

*Study Area B has a gap between Lowes and Edinburgh, where the Gordon Street Improvements Environmental Assessment took place. That project involved the design of protected bike facilities, which the Cycling Network Study will tie into. This will create a seamless protected cycling facility on Gordon from Downtown to the South End of Guelph.

Have Your Say

Care about road safety in Guelph? Travel along Eramosa, Gordon, and College? Would you like to start cycling or do you want to cycle more, but need more comfortable cycling routes? Are you an avid cyclist with something to say about bike infrastructure design? We need all of your perspectives to help inform the design of a new cycling network for our city.

Please join the conversation by participating below.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Map the routes

7 days

As part of this study, we’ll develop conceptual designs for 13 kilometres of “AAA” (all ages and abilities) protected cycling facilities along three corridors that provide safe, continuous connections for cycling and micro-mobility, such as scooters, to and from community destinations and major transit stops. This study will look at: 

  • Eramosa Road (Woolwich Street to Victoria Road)
  • Gordon Street (Waterloo Avenue to Clair Road)
  • College Avenue (Janefield Avenue to Dundas Lane)

The designs will help riders of any age or ability feel comfortable biking along these key streets in Guelph.

We need your input as we get started on the designs for these corridors. 

In this mapping survey, you are asked to identify the following for the three corridors in this study:

  • Areas where you have accessibility concerns. Where do you currently have trouble crossing the street? Where are the barriers? 
  • Areas where you have safety concerns. Where do you feel particularly unsafe? Do certain driveways or access points feel troublesome? Are there intersections that feel unsafe?
  • Important destinations. Where do you frequently visit?
  • Importation connections. Where do you connect to other routes in the city?
  • Design ideas or other suggestions. Considering the types of protected cycling infrastructure we are considering (cycle track, multi-use path, protected bike lane), do you have any suggestions related to the design at particular locations along the corridors?

Click "Add Pin" to begin! Drag and drop the pin to the spot you want to comment on. 


Map Legend

 Study Area Boundary
 Existing Bike Network (on-road, multi-use paths, and signed routes)
 Existing Trail Network

CLOSED: This map consultation has concluded.
Page last updated: 13 January 2022, 07:19